Our History

The Maryland Food Bank was founded in 1979 as the first food bank on the East Coast. In its first year, the Maryland Food Bank distributed 400,000 pounds of food to 38 assistance sites in Baltimore City. In 1981, the Maryland Food Bank expanded its focus, opening a branch on the Eastern Shore to better serve some of Maryland’s most impoverished counties. During much of the 1980s, the food bank worked to establish a strong foundation as the state’s central hunger-relief organization, building partnerships with food retailers and working with large agencies to create regional redistribution centers.

Establishing An Identity

For most of the ’90s, the Maryland Food Bank focused on building up its network of partners, teaming up with soup kitchens, shelters, and faith-based organizations across the state to distribute food to hungry Marylanders. During this time, MFB took on the Second Helping initiative and forged partnerships with Harvest for the Hungry and a host of other prominent hunger-relief organizations.

Ann Miller helping volunteers sort the first load of donations received by the organization.
In 1979, Ann Miller founded the Maryland Food Bank. Above she is pictured (at center), helping volunteers sort the first load of donations received by the organization.

In 2004, the Maryland Food Bank again expanded, transferring its headquarters from a 52,000 square-foot facility in Baltimore City to the current 93,000 square-foot warehouse in Baltimore County. With the increased space, the new facility has given the Maryland Food Bank the capacity to accept, store and ultimately distribute more food, growing its impact significantly. Its location, just miles from the city and sandwiched between two major highways, has also enabled more efficient distribution statewide.

Fresh thinking

"Hunger creates endless unfortunate cycles that prevent individual success and halt collective progress." - Deborah Flateman, President & CEO
In 2007, the Maryland Food Bank welcomed its current President & CEO, Deborah Flateman, former CEO of the Vermont Food Bank. Since her arrival, the Maryland Food Bank has conducted a hunger gap analysis, redefined its mission, developed a strategic five-year plan and implemented sweeping changes to maximize efficiency and effectiveness.

From 2008 to 2010, the Maryland Food Bank completed several capital improvements, including the expansion of the Eastern Shore branch’s freezer and the construction of the Charles T. Bauer Community Kitchen, a commercial-grade facility that allows us to reconstitute perishable foods into healthy frozen meals.

Since 2007, the Maryland Food Bank’s distribution has more than tripled to more than 100,000 meals per day in FY 2014.

forging a hunger-free future

In 2012, the Maryland Food Bank expanded its reach westward, merging with Food Resources in Hagerstown, MD. Since then, the Maryland Food Bank – Western Branch has doubled the output of food into Western, MD, distributing more than 4 million meals in FY 2014.

With more than 35 years under its belt, the Maryland Food Bank has built strong relationships with local businesses and receives food donations from a broad range of manufacturers, growers, retailers, wholesalers and individual communities statewide. The Maryland Food Bank’s food distribution continues to increase every year, and the organization intends to expand its impact… until hunger ends.

Today, the Maryland Food Bank is the heart of Maryland’s food assistance structure, providing food to a network of more than 900 soup kitchens, pantries, shelters and other community-based organizations across the state.

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